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Pitch vs. Presentation Decks

Cropped shot of a mature businessman working at his deskhttp://195.154.178.81/DATA/i_collage/pi/shoots/806194.jpgIt was more than 20 years ago that I first heard a set of presentation slides called a “deck.” Back in the ‘90s we stacked up the transparent acetate sheets used for presentation like a deck of cards. People today still call a slide presentation a “deck,” even though the slides are digital.  But when they talk about a “pitch deck” vs. a “presentation deck,” what’s the distinction there?

Although the terminology isn’t really settled, many today say a “pitch deck” is the set of slides a startup company sends to potential investors via email. The pitch deck, which can be read at leisure, gives the investor a chance to assess the startup and decide whether to go ahead and grant a meeting. The “presentation deck” is what you show when you get the meeting.

The two are very different.

A pitch deck must be self-explanatory. Because you won’t be there to take the audience through it, it must stand on its own. Even though the pitch deck may be a PowerPoint, Keynote, or some other commercial slide management application, readers can pause and re-read any part of it they want to, proceeding at their own pace and absorbing information at their own rate. You’re free to fill a pitch deck with written words and detailed information because it will be acting in the role of an introductory report.

But a presentation deck (also known as a demo-day presentation) should, by contrast, be chiefly visual. Since a human being will be standing there moving the slides along while speaking, the presentation deck should clarify and emphasize the spoken word. Never choke a presentation deck with extensive writing, complex spreadsheets, detailed screenshots, or involved charts. If you do, you’ll likely kill the presentation.

The point is that the slides we prepare aren’t always meant to be projected onto a screen. They may be used as a kind of written report. Before you create them, consider how you intend them to be viewed: individually, like the man above is doing; or by means of a speaker and a projected image. That goes a long way toward determining your content and slide design.